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Category: Mental Health

Alcohol and Anxiety | Manhattan Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Anxiety and Alcohol Use

By Ronnit Nazarian, Psy. D A common theme that I have found while speaking with patients who overdrink has been that they also experience an underlying anxiety disorder. Moreover, they have mentioned having difficulty finding something that helps them disconnect from their stress and anxiety that works as well as having a drink. To most people looking in from the outside, a person who experiences anxiety and a person who experiences drinking problems are often viewed as two separate individuals. Contrary to common belief, however, research shows that approximately 50% of individuals who experience alcohol problems also meet the criteria for one or more anxiety disorders.1 Alcohol use and anxiety are strongly linked and often called co-morbid disorders that interact

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The Effects of the Pandemic Lockdowns: Substance Use, Depression, Anxiety, Attention and Concentration

Written by Britt Gottlich, Psy D As we begin to see an end in sight for the pandemic, I’ve spent time reflecting on my time as a psychologist for the past year. While the pandemic may be ending and places are starting to open up and as we return to a sense of normalcy, I can’t help but wonder what aspects of the pandemic will stick long-term and how I can use what I have learned over the past year to help prepare. Attention and Concentration While Working from Home During the Pandemic The two biggest complaints people have reported have been difficulty with attention/concentration and social isolation. Having to work from home, and quarantine, completely changed our lives in regard

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Coping Mechanisms Against Depression and Anxiety during the COVID -19 Pandemic

Written by Olga Megwinoff, MD I did not want to write about anything related to the pandemic given that we are already so saturated by news and information related to it. However, I have realized it’s unavoidable. This pandemic and the ensuing quarantine have changed everything about the world as we know it. Most aspects of our personal, familial and social lives have been upended. Therefore, regardless of what I feel, I think that the most useful thing I can do is to write about coping mechanisms for how to endure social distancing and the fear. I want to focus on what we can do to help each other and ourselves as we are starting week 11 of social distancing

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Addiction 

By Britt Gottlich, Psy.D. I often meet with people who say they are unsure of whether they have experienced trauma or not. So, what is trauma? Most people define trauma based on how trauma is portrayed in the media. But, in reality, it is a very subjective experience. Something that may be traumatic for one person may not be traumatic for another. The American Psychological Association defines trauma as “an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster.” The way I like to understand trauma is based on an individual’s interpretation of the event. As children, we live under the assumption that “good things happen to good people and bad things happen to bad people.”

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Why More Attorneys Are Searching for an Addiction Therapist Near Me

The Lawyer: The Partyer and the Alcoholic

It’s a tired popular media trope: the attorney, burdened by the stresses of work, pours a glass of bourbon at the end of a long day. Maybe he is waiting for a verdict to come in after an impassioned speech in front of a jury, maybe she is prepping for a long day at the Supreme Court ahead. Alcohol as a coping mechanism in pop culture is as old as television itself.

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Dual Diagnosis and the Benefits of Treating Co-Occurring Disorders Simultaneously

Co-Occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders

A person struggling with a substance use disorder (SUD) may experience significant barriers to recovery that may range from social support to lack of quality treatment options. One common barrier is a lack of dual diagnosis treatment when necessary. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) states that a third of substance use admissions in 2017 involved a co-occurring mental health disorder. When a person suffers from two behavioral health conditions simultaneously, failure to effectively address them both with evidence-based treatment could affect the recovery process. Here’s how dual diagnosis treatment can help.

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