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Category: Alcoholism and Recovery

Depressed Man with Alcohol Addiction

Q & A: The Complex Cycle of Alcohol Use and Depression 

By: Tracey Basett, Psy.D. The relationship between depression and alcohol use is a very complicated one. This is because both depression and alcohol can exacerbate the effects of each other in unhealthy ways. Although there is the common perception that depression causes alcohol misuse, the majority of studies show that alcohol use actually increases the likelihood of depression (1 & 2). In addition, studies also report a co-morbid relationship between depression and alcohol that actually increases with age. It has been shown that the combination of Alcohol Use Disorder and Depression is “associated with higher risk of alcohol dependence, suicide attempt, lower global functioning, and life dissatisfaction” (3).  The complex relationship between alcohol and depression for a lot of people

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Alcohol and Anxiety | Manhattan Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Anxiety and Alcohol Use

By Ronnit Nazarian, Psy. D A common theme that I have found while speaking with patients who overdrink has been that they also experience an underlying anxiety disorder. Moreover, they have mentioned having difficulty finding something that helps them disconnect from their stress and anxiety that works as well as having a drink. To most people looking in from the outside, a person who experiences anxiety and a person who experiences drinking problems are often viewed as two separate individuals. Contrary to common belief, however, research shows that approximately 50% of individuals who experience alcohol problems also meet the criteria for one or more anxiety disorders.1 Alcohol use and anxiety are strongly linked and often called co-morbid disorders that interact

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The Importance of In-Person Addiction and Alcoholism Treatment During the COVID 19 Pandemic

There have been many mental health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, including increased depression, anxiety and exacerbations of PTSD as a result of isolation, changes in lifestyle and fear. Along with increases in suicidality and domestic abuse, one of the most dangerous mental health effects of the pandemic has been increased substance abuse.1Along with all the dangerous effects of substance abuse there have been “an increasing number of reports from national state and local media,” including New York, of “an increase in opioid and other drug related mortality.”2 What is the Cause of Increased Substance Abuse During the Pandemic? The cause of increased substance abuse is many. More people are using illicit drugs and alcohol to cope with their symptoms

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Meditation and Mindfulness for Alcoholism and Addiction

Meditation and Mindfulness for Alcoholism and Addiction Written by Olga Megwinoff, MD There is so much referring to meditation and mindfulness. Every mental health guru speaks of mindfulness and media outlets are saturated with everything meditation. It is definitely trendy and even in my own neighborhood, in the non-trendy suburbs, we started a meditation group. When something is so trendy, it can be easy to dismiss as a valuable and important tool in psychotherapy. Nonetheless, I am ever grateful that I pursued this method of treatment as it changed my views and opened the door to the great teachings and understanding of the mind from the eastern psychology perspective. In this, my first blog, I will try to explain in

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Addiction 

By Britt Gottlich, Psy.D. I often meet with people who say they are unsure of whether they have experienced trauma or not. So, what is trauma? Most people define trauma based on how trauma is portrayed in the media. But, in reality, it is a very subjective experience. Something that may be traumatic for one person may not be traumatic for another. The American Psychological Association defines trauma as “an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster.” The way I like to understand trauma is based on an individual’s interpretation of the event. As children, we live under the assumption that “good things happen to good people and bad things happen to bad people.”

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Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Addiction and Alcoholism

By Tracey Basset, PsyD Making the decision to seek help for a substance use problem is challenging enough. On top of that, for a lot of people, they face the challenge of choosing where to go, who to see, and what type of therapy will benefit them most. This can be a very confusing and daunting process. My aim for this post is to provide some useful information about the benefits of one type of therapy, my favorite type of addiction therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy? CBT is based on the notion that the way we think influences how we feel and, subsequently, how we behave. Think of it like a domino effect—something happens, you form a

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Better Recovery With Medically Supervised Detox

The effects of alcohol account for one in three emergency room visits every year. This is due in part to the effects of alcohol detox and withdrawal. Alcohol withdrawal is the body and brain chemistry readjusting to a permanent sober state, once the individual is no longer consuming alcohol. Chronic alcohol use changes brain chemistry by inhibiting neurotransmitters that induce feelings of relaxation and excitability. Without alcohol these neurotransmitters work in overdrive, similar to a rebound effect.

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